The Suzette stitch

Introduction

This "stitch" is actually a combination of stitches rather than one stitch. It consists of rows with a single crochet and double crochet worked in the same stitch followed by skipping next next stitch. The last stitch in each row is a single crochet to make things easier at the beginning of the next row. I've seen a slight variation on this too where it is called a "modified sedge stitch" in which the final stitch in each row is the full (sc, dc) in the last stitch rather than just a single crochet stitch. I like this version of the stitch too because you have to skip the first stitch in your new row (all stitches from row 2 onwards are worked only into the single crochet stitches) and it makes the edges look interesting. In my sample square, I've made 10 chains and worked (sc, dc) in the 2nd ch from hook, skipped one and then repeated this until the last 2 stitches, then sc in the last stitch. Rows 2 onwards are all identical: *(sc, dc) in the first st, sk 1* 4 times, sc in the last st. After the last st I made a single crochet border all round so that I can use this square for my stitch challenge.

The photos above show 10 rows of either Suzette stitch (burgundy square) or "modified sedge stitch" (yellow square). Both look fairly similar at the sides in the photo so you don't necessarily notice right away that the edges are different in the above photos. However, I have noticed it more in some other things I've made with the Suzette stitch. Both of the squares are unfinished in the photos since I haven't added the border of single crochet stitches yet.  Normally, my next post would be one continuing my stitch with the Suzette stitch. However, this time I'm pausing for a couple more weeks before sharing the stitch challenge. The reasons for this will be obvious when I next post about the stitch challenge. In the meantime, I'll be doing 2 other stitch patterns over the next 2 weeks.


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published